Sunset Boulevard Screening

Tonight, Wednesday, April 11, at Fort Worth’s Modern Museum, you can see a free screening of SUNSET BOULEVARD at 7:30 PM. Not often do you see a free show, so come on over to 3200 Darnell Street. You do need to go online to Eventbrite to get your free order. What fun! Nothing better than a movie at the Modern, unless it’s a free movie at the Modern.

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After Hours at Kimbell’s Saturday Party

Come join Annie tonight, Saturday, December 9, 5:30–7:30 PM at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth’s Cultural District. Get festive with blood orange mimosas, stunning art, and live jazz. After Hours guests will enjoy docent-guided tours of Casanova: The Seduction of Europe, live music by the Joey Carter Trio, prizes, appetizers, and a cash bar with wine and beer in addition to a custom cocktail.

After Hours is free for Museum members; nonmembers pay $30 at the door. Reservations are not needed. To receive e-mail reminders, send a request to membership@kimbellmuseum.org. It’s all happening later today at the Renzo Piano Pavilion.

Learn more about the Kimbell Art Museum by calling 817.332.8451, or visiting its web site at http://www.kimbellart.org. Become a member and join the fun.

Annie Ambles to the Kimbell for After Hours party

Fascinating Man–Free Lecture

Photo of the Piano Auditorium panel discussion and audience during a State of the Arts programThe Kimbell Art Museum is presenting a Friday evening lecture that is free to the public with no registration requirement. Just show up to learn about “Casanova in Hogarth’s London” as presented by Duncan Robinson, director emeritus of the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, United Kingdom, and former director of the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, Connecticut. The lecture is about an hour long, starting at 6:00 PM, this Friday, December 8, 2017.

As Samuel Johnson famously remarked, “when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.” The city that Casanova visited was a rapidly expanding metropolis, a place of stark contrasts and social tensions, which was true of eighteenth-century England as a whole. In this lecture, Duncan Robinson explores the way in which the art of Hogarth and his contemporaries both captured and commented on the rich fabric of London and the varied fortunes of its inhabitants.

This program was made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Evening lectures by distinguished guest speakers, held throughout the year, address a range of topics relating to the appreciation and interpretation of art. They are free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Pavilion Auditorium; simulcast in Kahn Auditorium. Come one, come all, to learn more about the fascinating personality of Casanova. There is underground parking that is also free to the public.

Annie would amble with you to the Kimbell, but she’ll be at her condo’s Christmas party Friday night.

Lonesome Dove Part I.–“Leaving”

If you’re a fan of the Lonesome Dove TV mini-series, you’ll want to put May 20 on your calendar. Starting at 6:30 pm on that Friday night, the Sid Richardson Museum of Western Art will show the first episode.

It’s free, but you do have to register. Today Annie learned that there are only nine (9) more available seats. Go to the Museum’s web site <www.sidrichardsonmuseum.org/event-info> to reserve your seat. You may also register through the Museum’s Facebook page. This one’s for you, Michael.

The outstanding staff will make you feel welcome and even provide popcorn, candy, and soda/water. It’s a fun night. The other three episodes will be scheduled later, so check back to see when each will be shown. Annie thinks episode 2 is on June 17, but registration for that showing has yet to open.

Sid Richardson Museum's photo.

Annie Ambles to the Sid Richardson Museum to see Episode 1 of Lonesome Dove

The Artist’s Eye

The Artist’s Eye
Devon Nowlin

Saturday, April 30, 11 am

Please join artist Devon Nowlin and Jennifer Casler Price, curator for Asian and
non-Western art at the Kimbell Art Museum, for a gallery talk. Nowlin’s Monument to the Loved will be on display at the Kimbell during the talk, and she will discuss her own artwork in relation to works in the Museum’s collection, including a 13th-century
French reliquary casket.
Admission is free. No reservations required.
Kahn Building galleries
Left: Devon Nowlin, Monument to the Loved, 2016, oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and
Artspace 111
Right: Reliquary Casket, c. 1200–1220, champlevé enamel on copper, wood core. Kimbell Art Museum
Annie Ambles shares Kimbell Art Museum information

 

Buffalo Soldier Camp

Buffalo soldiers on a mountain trail by Frederic Remington

Whoa! If you like to play soldier or just into the Western thing, you’ll want to go to the Buffalo Soldier Camp Fun Day, Saturday, April 16, 1:00 PM until 4:00 PM.  There will be food, music, archery, a bounce house, horse shoe tossing, horse back riding, and a whole lot more fun things to do. It’s all free.

Mosey over to 3534 East Berry Street in Fort Worth 76105, to spend an enjoyable couple of hours. Guess you’ll have to do this next year as Annie was out of town this weekend and unable to make this blog post until Sunday. Oh, well, the Buffalo Soldiers are special, and it’s good to know a little of their history.

“No one is quite certain why the Indians nicknamed the African American cavalrymen “buffalo soldiers.” Some say it was because the men were rugged as buffalo and others that it was because the Indians saw a resemblance between the black soldier’s hair and the buffalo’s shaggy coat. It has also been pointed out that many black soldiers favored the long buffalo-robe coats. Although the name was primarily applied to the cavalry, it was sometimes extended to include the black infantry. The infantry, black and white, were given the dubious honorific of Walk-a-Heaps.” This information came from the History page of this web site <http://www.discoverseaz.com/History/BufSold.html&gt; which contains more facts about the famous Buffalo Soldiers.

Annie Ambles admires the Buffalo Soldiers

Kimbell After Hours

Annie looks forward every month to the second Saturday night.You may want to join her about 5:30 PM at the Kimbell Art Museum and begin your second Saturday evening with great jazz, international art, appetizers, tours, prizes, and a delicious signature cocktail. There is a cash bar; credit cards are accepted.

The event is free for members (number of free tickets the same as for exhibitions); $30 for nonmembers. No reservations are needed.  You don’t need to really dress up, and parking is free.

Annie Ambles to After Hours